Officials urge Halloween safety

State and local officials encourage parents to keep a watchful eye on their children this Halloween


By Alex Stuckey
Idaho Falls Post Register

IDAHO FALLS, Idaho — Ghouls, goblins and vampires will be taking to the streets today, hoping to fill their buckets, bags and pillowcases to the brim with sweets.

But state and local officials urge parents to keep a watchful eye on their children this Halloween.

Dr. Ernest G. Bertha, right, director of Pediatric Emergency Medicine at Temple University Children's Medical Center in Philadelphia, points out a reflective safety panel on a Halloween costume worn by Nakera Blair, 8, of Philadelphia, Tuesday, Oct. 14, 2003. (AP Image)
Dr. Ernest G. Bertha, right, director of Pediatric Emergency Medicine at Temple University Children's Medical Center in Philadelphia, points out a reflective safety panel on a Halloween costume worn by Nakera Blair, 8, of Philadelphia, Tuesday, Oct. 14, 2003. (AP Image)

The Idaho Falls Police Department encourages parents to dress their kids in bright, reflective costumes so they are more visible, said Joelyn Hansen, department spokeswoman.

All children should be accompanied by an adult and carry a flashlight, Hansen added.

But sending your kid out with glow sticks may not be the best idea.

Glow sticks are soft and break easily. The glowing liquid can sting a child's eyes or mouth, according to a Department of Health and Welfare news release. It's one of the most common calls to the Poison Center every year, according to the release.

The department also asks parents to make sure costumes are warm and flame resistant.

Hansen also suggests trick-or-treating in familiar areas.

"If children go out trick-or-treating, parents should focus on areas where they are familiar with the neighbors and where there is more security," she said.

And, of course, parents should always check their children's candy to make sure no one has tampered with it, Hansen said.

Finally, parents should keep track of what their teenagers are doing on Halloween, Hansen said.

"Not all children are angels on Halloween," she said. "(Parents) need to be aware that their kids will be held accountable for any damages or problems that they cause."For more on Halloween safety, visit the National Crime Prevention website, www.ncpc.org.

Copyright 2012 The Post Register

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